The Return Of Dracula (1958)

the return of dracula 1958

If Dracula knew the movie would be this bad he never would have come back. There have been a lot of really dumb Dracula movies. This one deserves its place at the bottom of the pack.

Investigator Meyerman and his pals are in a cemetery waiting for sunrise to finally put an end to Dracula. Okay…here comes the sun. Time to open the coffin. Nobody’s home. The Count is busy on a train switching identities with artist Bellac Gordal (Francis Lederer). He’s heading for the small town of Carleton, California to stay with his cousin Cora.

Cute teenager Rachael (Norma Eberhardt) has been writing to Bellac and digs his sophisticated ways. Her boyfriend Tim doesn’t get it. Dropping by for dinner is Reverend Doctor Whitfield (Gage Clarke). Bella isn’t in a hurry to join them. He starts to come down as soon as Whitfield is leaving.

The next day Rachael wants to show Bella the sites but he’s not in his room. He’s actually in his coffin in a cave near a mine shaft. Like any good vampire his coffin is equipped with a smoke machine. When the sun goes down he gets up. He runs into Rachael and says he’s been painting all day.

She invites him to the parish house. That’s where she reads to a blind girl named Jennie. He’s not in a hurry to go with her. She reads to a nervous Jennie until the girl falls into an uneasy sleep. Since she hasn’t seen any Dracula movies Rachael takes a cross out of Jennie’s hand and puts it away. Rachael leaves and Bellac comes in through the window. He and Jennie are going to be great pals.

The next morning Whitfield tells Rachael to come to the parish house. Jennie is acting weird. She mumbles about having to close the window. She gets up. She goes to the window. She falls down dead.

After the funeral Mack Bryant shows up. He says he’s from immigration and wants to see Bellac’s papers. A man fell off the train in Europe carrying immigrants to America and all the recent visitors to the U.S. from that group are being investigated. Bellac’s papers check out and Mack manages to sneak a picture of him with his cigarette lighter.

Mack isn’t from immigration. Outside he meets Meyerman and tells him he got a picture. He takes the camera and tells Mack to catch the next train out of town. Bellac goes to the cemetery to bring Jennie out. He wants her to call Mack away from the train station. Mack falls for it and is attacked by what’s supposed to be a wolf. Whatever it is it puts paid to Mack. The movie’s budget didn’t have room for a decent wolf.

Meyerman asks the sheriff for help. Rachael wants Bellac to come to a Halloween party at the parish house but he’s not in a big hurry. Meyerman wants Whitfield to open Jennie’s coffin so he can hammer a wooden stake into her. Whitfield’s not buying it. Then Meyerman shows him the picture of Cora and no Bellac. That’s all it takes.

Rachael tries one more time to get Bellac to go to the party. He’s not in his room but some paintings are leaning against the wall. She’s not happy when she sees one of her in a casket. The movie gets to its predictable conclusion and puts an end to a total waste of celluloid.

 

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About vintage45

I'm a big fan of vintage books,movies,TV shows and music. I encourage everyone to patronize your local used book/record store and pick up some of the good stuff. My posts are capsule reviews of some favorites that you may want to investigate. The albums posted aren't really reviews but items from my collection that are still available. I try and point out highlights of each one and let the music speak for itself. Thanks to all for checking out the blog.
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