Private’s Progress (1956)

British war comedy about a naive army recruit and his uncle’s art scam. A lot of subtle humor and well worth seeing. 

Stanley Windrush (Ian Carmichael) is called from University to the army towards the end of the war. After barely getting throgh basic training and failing his officer selection board he meets up with Pvt.Cox (Richard Attenborough). He knows all the scams.

Stanley ends up under the command of Major Hitchcock (Terry-Thomas). Stanley’s uncle Bertram (Dennis Price) is a higher up in the War Office. Stanley goes to interpreter’s school and learns Japanese. He’s contacted by his uncle to take part in “Operation Hatrack.” Pvt. Cox is also a part of it.

The object is to recover a load of stolen art work from the castle of General von Lembeck. The real object is to steal the art and sell it to some crooked art dealers. Stanley doesn’t have a clue but Cox knows what’s going on. The men disguise themselves as Germans. Stanley gets in trouble because he doesn’t speak a word of it.

This movie was a lot of fun as was the sequel, 1959’s “I’m All Right Jack.” Carmichael, Thomas, Attenborough and Price all return for the sequel. Do yourself a favor and see them both.

About vintage45

I'm a big fan of vintage books,movies,TV shows and music. I encourage everyone to patronize your local used book/record store and pick up some of the good stuff. My posts are capsule reviews of some favorites that you may want to investigate. The albums posted aren't really reviews but items from my collection that are still available. I try and point out highlights of each one and let the music speak for itself. Thanks to all for checking out the blog.
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